1.27.2005

Jefferson on Ancient Philosophy

Michael Gilleland has a wonderful letter of Thomas Jefferson's, opining on ancient philosopy.

As you say of yourself, I too am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greece and Rome have left us. Epictetus indeed, has given us what was good of the Stoics; all beyond, of their dogmas, being hypocrisy and grimace.


He has some faint praise for Seneca and bemoans the lack of good translations of Epictetus. There are compliments for Jesus, interspersed heavily with criticism of Christianity.

The establishment of the innocent and genuine character of this benevolent moralist, and the rescuing it from the imputation of imposture, which has resulted from artificial systems, invented by ultra-Christian sects, unauthorized by a single word ever uttered by him, is a most desirable object, and one to which Priestley has successfully devoted his labors and learning. It would in time, it is to be hoped, effect a quiet euthanasia of the heresies of bigotry and fanaticism which have so long triumphed over human reason, and so generally and deeply afflicted mankind; but this work is to be begun by winnowing the grain from the chaff of the historians of his life.


Jefferson rocked.

Yours truly,
Mr. X

...back in black...

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